Guinness World Record “joggler” ran in Military World Games

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Navy News / October 24, 2019

Joggling is the competitive sport of juggling while running.  It’s actually a thing. You can look it up on YouTube.

That’s what Naval Warfare Officer Lieutenant (Navy) (Lt(N)) Michael-Lucien Bergeron did five years ago. He now holds two joggling Guinness World Records.

Lt(N) Bergeron learned juggling at circus camp as a teen and later got into competitive running. In 2014, a friend pointed him to videos of jogglers on the internet and it invigorated him not only to try the unique sport, but to start getting serious about running in general.

He started juggling balls, but now he’ll sometimes run while tossing machetes or even fiery torches in the air.

In 2018, Lt(N) Bergeron achieved two men’s world records in the sport of joggling – “Half Marathon Joggling, 3 Objects” with a time of 1:17:10 hours, and “10 km Joggling, 3 Objects” with a time of 35:36 minutes.

Setting world records isn’t easy. Lt(N) Bergeron runs and joggles around 120 km a week, a distance made up by several smaller runs and one big weekly 30-36 km run. Other regular runners sometimes get jealous when they see him running, especially in official competitions.

“You’re always going to get a few people that are frustrated when they’ve been training for years and I run faster than them while juggling,” he said. “(However), most people are quite impressed.”

Lt(N) Bergeron is not just a fast joggler, he’s an incredibly fast runner period. He has won competitive races while juggling the whole time.

Last year, when not joggling, Lt(N) Bergeron won the Canadian Armed Forces Running Championship marathon in Ottawa with a 2:40:43 hour time. This made him the national leader and this October he represented Canada at the CISM Military World Games in Wuhan, China.

CISM is the International Military Sports Council and it hosts military world games every four years, always one year before the Olympic Summer Games.

He may not be joggling in that competition, but he’ll be using the perfect upright posture he’s honed throughout the unique sport.

“Except my arms won’t be as a goofy,” he said.